Blue-eyed House Snake

Blue-eyed House Snake

Blue-eyed Leucistic House Snake. Photo by Dean Boshoff

Blue-eyed House Snake. Photo by Dean Boshoff

Blue-eyed House Snake. By Dean Boshoff

And I lost this one… Dismally!

I’ve always been passionate about Brown house snakes, so when this gorgeous snake came to be in my possession, I had the opportunity to do something awesome! Pioneer a new morph. The first ever captive blue-eyed housie!

Everything went perfect for well over a year. He had settled into captivity nicely & was feeding and shedding with no complication. Then last year Feb while I was away on a field trip my girlfriend gave me a call saying that she has some really bad news… The snake had died. At the time I had in excess of 16 brown house snakes, mostly virgin females I had intended to use for this project, but as murphy’s law would have it, the one that dies for no apparent reason happens to be the most special snake I have ever owned. It took me ages to get over this loss… but here are the pics!

The silver lining to the story is that believe it or not a 2nd one was found. Whether or not these will eventually surface I’m unsure of…
Here are some pictures of the snake in question.

Blue-eyed Leucistic House Snake. Photo by Dean Boshoff

Blue-eyed House Snake. Photo by Dean Boshoff

Blue-eyed Leucistic House Snake

Blue-eyed House Snake. Photo by Dean Boshoff

Blue-eyed Leucistic House Snake

Blue-eyed House Snake. Photo by Dean Boshoff

Blue-eyed Leucistic House Snake. Photo by Dean Boshoff

Blue-eyed House Snake. Photo by Dean Boshoff

The exciting news is this mutation has now been established in captivity. This mutation was first called a Blue-eyed Leucistic as the adults look very similar to other leucistic mutations that we see in other colubrids. Since more of this mutation has been bred breeders have notices the babies hatch out like a very light hypo house snake and as they grow and shed they get whiter and whiter. Even as adults they never go a pure white colour and you can still see their faded patterns like you can see in the picture above. If this was a true Blue-eyed Leucistic mutation you would expect the babies to hatch out pure white with no pattern and blue eyes and look the same as they grow into adults.

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